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my stock (tank) is appreciating

April 28, 2009

One of the joys of gliding through Slaterville on a cruiser bike is the slow-going, sight-seeing nature of it. The hills, the horses, the random junk treasure piles. Like this stock tank, offered to me for free by the neighbor who lives across from a junk heap that hasn’t moved in 20 years. It reminds me of TX and since the bottom’s rusted out, it’s perfect for planting something big!
stock-tank-3220
I wasn’t sure what to put inside it until reading Margaret Roach’s post on putting hostas in pots and overwintering them in your veg patch. The Hosta ‘Sum and Substance’ given by Andrea before they moved would be perfect for our new/old tank. It’s no coincidence that the best spot for it is where the hostas are growing now, snugged up next to the porch under the big Norway spruce trees. This weekend I heard Michael Shadrack, hosta expert, speak at the rock garden society meeting, and came home with a smaller hosta (he’s big on the small ones), ‘Blue Clown,’ so that will go in, too. Along with these I’m going to try the Begonia rex ‘Escargot,’ also a gift from Andrea, Primroses that won’t have enough water where they are come summer, and something to trail over the edge, probably periwinkle. All of it will have to come out in the winter, but I’m hoping it will charm us throughout summer. My honey started to make some disparaging remarks about the tank’s rustic appearance, until I reminded him we live in old servants’ quarters and drive 12-year-old cars. Still not sure he agrees with me, but he is sold on the planter idea and now wants to get one for the other side of the porch stair. I’m on the lookout…

As to how to fill it without buying another 5 cubic yards of dirt & rock fill, our neighbor suggested using recyclable bottles or cans in the bottom rather than rock. He’s seen it done before, and since he’s likely to buy this place to use as a rental when we move, he has an interest in not relocating all that dirt and rock. I think it’s a good idea. With luck, the project should be done in a couple of weeks, hopefully before the hostas break through too much more ground. Pictures to come, of course.

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. Randy permalink
    April 29, 2009 8:39 pm

    You are moving? You just got here…

  2. April 30, 2009 1:40 am

    i bet that stock tank was a sight for sore eyes… and will be stunning once filled with your plants – i can see sum & substance happily setting root in that baby!
    do you have any styrofoam peanuts hiding in your basement? you can put them in some wegmans bags, and use that to fill the bottom of the tank too.
    now all you need to find is a miniature oil rig for some vertical interest – surely that would complement its yet-to-be-found twin on the other side of the porch. come on, c, you know you want one…

  3. April 30, 2009 11:10 am

    Randy, we’ll have to move when the man gets his degree. The job market starts this fall, so, if all goes well, we will be starting over somewhere new in fall 2010. I asked if there’s any chance of it being here but was told that’s not usually the way of things at this university. It makes me a little sad since I’m still learning so much about here. But our families and our hearts are out West. So all potential house and garden projects are done now with an eye to leaving: “Do we want to invest in that? Do we want to move it?” and so on. I hate moving.

  4. April 30, 2009 11:14 am

    Ms. A–if there were any peanuts down there, they got thrown away in the Big Mold Remediation Project of January 2009! uggghhhh. A co-worker has 2 teenage boys who drink milk by the vat, so she’s promised to bring me in a giant bag of gallon jugs. I should have enough by Monday!

  5. April 30, 2009 7:51 pm

    Remind me Sunday if you want peanunts.

    But the big question is not what to fill it with or plant in it. What color are you going to paint it? Something Frida Kahlo-y, I hope.

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